The Best Tweets of the 2017 Golden Globes—From Meryl to Moonlight

Brought to you by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and champagne, the Golden Globe Awards are very easily the most cost-free-wheeling show of trophy season. Each January, celebrities dress up, get drunk, and at times even trade the platitudes for candor. This year’s show was no diverse, with legendary acceptance speeches jockeying for attention alongside media screwups and flashes of actual, organic spontaneity. But if you happened to miss it—or just want to relive the highlights—the massively crowdsourced recap identified as Twitter is happy to support.

The Best Tweets of the 2017 Golden Globe Awards

Ahead of the show even began, the red carpet offered more than a couple of awkward moments—one in certain that became a recurring theme. When interviewing Pharrell Williams, who developed and contributed music for the film Hidden Figures, Jenna Bush referred to the film as “Hidden Fences.” Fences is another film that snagged Globe nominations—but while it’s the adaptation of a hugely famous play that won a Pulitzer when it came out 30 years ago, it also has a largely black cast, which made Bush’s stumble a tiny more egregious.

Blunders aside, the red carpet was full of the usual ogling and awkwardness.

Meanwhile, these hoping to stream the show got a massive surprise from its home network. Good operate, Peacock!

Ultimately, the ceremony began…

…with a musical number that felt like one big, sloppy fan-service kiss to Television.

Jimmy Fallon kicked off his monologue with a TelePrompter malfunction and a quantity of shots at the incoming POTUS. Not absolutely everyone was feeling the newfound friskiness from the guy who so (in)famously tousled Donald Trump’s hair on his show final year.

The awards started going out—with a few surprises in the mix. To kick things off, Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Kick-Ass, Godzilla) won for his supporting turn in Nocturnal Animals. Not the outcome numerous individuals had been expecting.

Then Tracee Ellis Ross, Atlanta, and Sarah Paulson won and—in the eyes of Twitter, at least—things got back on track.

Things started dragging a bit after that, though Hugh Laurie came with the Lauriest speech that ever Lauried.

Not each and every bit went more than properly, of course.

OK, so don’t forget that issue we said about “Hidden Fences”? Nicely, this occurred.

Presenters kept presenting, and La La Land kept winning.

Meanwhile, “Hidden Fences” only gained traction.

Then it was back to the awards.

In what will likely be the most talked about moment of the evening, Meryl Streep took to the stage to accept the Cecil B. DeMille award—and went following President-elect Donald Trump. Challenging.

Then Donald Glover was back, this time winning for his acting in Atlanta.

But La La Land wasn’t fairly finished winning each and every. Single. Award.

Oh, and Brad Pitt showed up!

And Casey Affleck won for Manchester By the Sea.

Isabelle Huppert took home a surprising win for Elle, beating out the likes of Natalie Portman, Amy Adams, and Jessica Chastain.

In the end, following getting shut out all night, Moonlight took residence an award for Very best Motion Image, Drama.

All round, there weren’t too numerous surprises. La La Land is specifically the kind of film the HFPA loves, and just about everything else people were hoping to see win managed to nab a Globe or two. Except, that is, for the network that brought us Game of Thrones, The Evening OfWestworld, and Insecure.

See you next year, all!

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Golden Globes Nominees Complete of Surprises, Snubs, and Stranger Factors

The nominees for the 74th annual Golden Globes awards were announced this morning, and, as anticipated, awards-season darlings La La Land and Moonlight dominated. But because the Globes function as a sort of bizarro counterpart to the Oscars and the Emmys—the “Hey, we’re all drunk!” vibe of the Globes’ telecast could also apply to its voters—there have been still lots of pleasant surprises to be had: Issa Rae’s turn on HBO’s Insecure earned a nomination, as did Simon Helberg’s overall performance in Florence Foster Jenkins. And Deadpool earned not only a Greatest Motion Image, Musical or Comedy nomination, but also an acting nod for Ryan Reynolds. We never would have pegged the Merc for that kind of acclaim!

Also surprising: Previous winner Mr. Robot was left out of the Greatest Television Series, Drama category, although nods did include Game of Thrones as well as new series The CrownWestworld, and Netflix sci-fi throwback Stranger Things. And speaking of Hawkins High, Stranger star Winona Ryder landed a spot in the Best Performance by an Actress in a Tv Series, Drama (as did Westworld‘s Evan Rachel Wood). Will Ryder bring residence a statue? We’ll string up some Christmas lights to uncover out—but if that does not operate, we’ll just have to wait for the Golden Globes to air on January 8th. In the meantime, the complete list of nominees is beneath:

Ideal Motion Picture, Drama
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or Higher Water
Lion
Manchester By the Sea
Moonlight

Ideal Motion Image, Musical or Comedy
20th Century Women
Deadpool
Florence Foster Jenkins
La La Land
Sing Street

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama
Amy Adams, Arrival
Jessica Chastain, Miss Sloane
Isabelle Huppert, Elle
Ruth Negga, Loving
Natalie Portman, Jackie

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Image, Drama
Casey Affleck, Manchester By the Sea
Joel Edgerton, Loving
Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge
Viggo Mortensen, Captain Wonderful
Denzel Washington, Fences

Best Overall performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy
Annette Bening, 20th Century Women
Lily Collins, Guidelines Do not Apply
Hailee Steinfeld, The Edge of Seventeen
Emma Stone, La La Land
Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins

Greatest Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy
Colin Farrell, The Lobster
Hugh Grant, Florence Foster Jenkins
Ryan Gosling, La La Land
Jonah Hill, War Dogs
Ryan Reynolds, Deadpool

Ideal Efficiency by an Actress in a Supporting Part
Viola Davis, Fences
Naomie Harris, Moonlight
Nicole Kidman, Lion
Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures
Michelle Williams, Manchester By the Sea

Ideal Functionality by an Actor in a Supporting Role
Mahershala Ali, Moonlight
Jeff Bridges, Hell or Higher Water
Simon Helberg, Florence Foster Jenkins
Dev Patel, Lion
Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Nocturnal Animals

Greatest Director
Damien Chazelle, La La Land
Tom Ford, Nocturnal Animals
Mel Gibson, Hacksaw Ridge
Barry Jenkins, Moonlight
Kenneth Lonergan, Manchester by the Sea

Ideal Screenplay
Hell or Higher Water
La La Land
Manchester By the Sea
Moonlight
Nocturnal Animals

Best Motion Picture, Animated
Kubo and the Two Strings
Moana
My Life as a Zucchini
Sing
Zootopia

Ideal Motion Picture, Foreign Language
Divines
Elle
Neruda
The Salesman
Toni Erdmann

Greatest Original Score
Arrival
Hidden Figures
La La Land
Lion
Moonlight

Ideal Original Song
“Gold,” Gold
“City of Stars,” La La Land
“How Far I’ll Go,” Moana
“Faith,” Sing
“Can’t Cease the Feeling,” Trolls

Ideal Television Series, Drama
The Crown
Game of Thrones
Stranger Things
This Is Us
Westworld

Best Tv Series, Musical or Comedy
Atlanta
Black-ish
Mozart in the Jungle
Transparent
Veep

Very best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Created for Television
American Crime
The Dresser
The Night Manager
The Evening Of
The Individuals v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story

Ideal Overall performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or a Motion Image Made for Tv
Felicity Huffman, American Crime
Riley Keough, The Girlfriend Knowledge
Sarah Paulson, The Individuals v. O.J. Simpson
Charlotte Rampling, London Spy
Kerry Washington, Confirmation

Greatest Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or a Motion Picture Produced for Tv
Riz Ahmed, The Night Of
Bryan Cranston, All the Way
John Turturro, The Night Of
Tom Hiddleston, The Night Manager
Courtney B. Vance, The Individuals v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story

Ideal Performance by an Actress In A Tv Series, Drama
Catriona Balfe, Outlander
Claire Foy, The Crown
Keri Russell, The Americans
Winona Ryder, Stranger Issues
Evan Rachel Wood, Westworld

Ideal Efficiency by an Actor In A Tv Series, Drama
Rami Malek, Mr. Robot
Bob Odenkirk, Much better Get in touch with Saul
Matthew Rhys, The Americans
Liev Schreiber, Ray Donovan
Billy Bob Thornton, Goliath

Very best Overall performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Musical or Comedy
Rachel Bloom, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Veep
Sarah Jessica Parker, Divorce
Issa Rae, Insecure
Gina Rodriguez, Jane the Virgin
Tracee Ellis Ross, Black-ish

Ideal Efficiency by an Actor in a Tv Series, Musical or Comedy
Anthony Anderson, Black-ish
Gael Garcia Bernal, Mozart in the Jungle
Donald Glover, Atlanta
Nick Nolte, Graves
Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Restricted Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Olivia Colman, The Evening Manager
Lena Heady, Game of Thrones
Chrissy Metz, This Is Us
Mandy Moore, This Is Us
Thandie Newton, Westworld

Ideal Overall performance by an Actor in a Supporting Part in a Series, Restricted Series or Motion Picture Created for Television
Sterling K. Brown, The Men and women v. O.J. Simpson
Hugh Laurie, The Evening Manager
John Lithgow, The Crown
Christian Slater, Mr. Robot
John Travolta, The People v. O.J. Simpson

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